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Philip Carl Salzman

Philip Carl Salzman

Philip Carl Salzman served as professor of anthropology at McGill University from 1968 to 2018. He is the author of Culture and Conflict in the Middle East; the founding chair of the Commission on Nomadic Peoples of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences; the founding editor of Nomadic Peoples; and the author of Black Tents of Baluchistan; Pastoralism: Equality, Hierarchy, and the State; Thinking Anthropologically, Culture and Conflict in the Middle East; and Understanding Culture.

All stories by: Philip Carl Salzman

Identity Cancels Reality

Our current monomaniacal obsession with identity was midwifed by postmodern theory. In the past, students of society and culture emulated science in theory and methodology, striving to offer objective, disinterested, and impartial knowledge about human life. Postmodernism attacked science and…

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Terrorism Today

Great news! We are told by the Washington Post: “Terrorist attacks are quietly declining around the world.”[1] Citing the University of Maryland’s report on terrorism[2], the WP author points out that there are fewer terrorist attacks since 2016. So, nothing to see here, folks;…

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Commissars in Our Universities

“The term ‘politically correct’ was coined in the late 1920s by the Soviets and their ideological allies around the world to describe why the views of certain of the party faithful needed correction to the party line.[1] Totalitarian movements and…

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The New Anthropology

In their recent “Open Letter Demanding the Overhaul of McGill’s Statement of Academic Freedom,” the Anthropology Students Association and the Anthropology Graduate Student Association of McGill University have schooled us about the new anthropology. Here are some of its dimensions:…

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How to Achieve Woke Justice

Racial theorists and activists claim that certain minorities, mainly “people of color,” are discriminated against in America, Canada, and the West generally. The measure used to gauge racial discrimination is “representation” on the basis of the percentage of the general…

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The Invention of ‘Systemic Racism’

It is now the official view in government, industry, and education that African Americans and certain other “people of color” perform poorly in schools and the workforce, but nonetheless must be treated as if they perform well. The statistically weak…

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